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Tag Archives: women writers project

Introduction to RELAX NG and Schema Planning

This is an informal WWP workshop held on two dates (April 13 and 20); please email wwp[at]northeastern[dot]edu if you would like to attend. For more on RELAX NG, please see: http://relaxng.org/

Introduction to TEI Customization

Since the release in 2007 of the most recent version of TEI (P5), TEI users have had a very different relationship to the TEI Guidelines. Unlike previous versions, TEI P5 does not exist in a “default” or “vanilla” state: any TEI schema used in a text encoding project must be generated from the TEI source  Continue Reading »

Introduction to TEI

Dissatisfied with Google Books? Curious about digital formats that can communicate scholarly ideas? This seminar offers an intensive exploration of scholarly text encoding, aimed at an audience of humanities scholars, archivists, and digital humanists. We focus on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines, a magnificent but complex language for representing digital scholarship and the gold  Continue Reading »

The WWP Announces New Publication: Women Writers in Review

Sarah Connell, Project Manager on the Women Writers Project, passed along another exciting announcement! Since 1986, The Women Writers Project has been committed to ensuring that texts written by women in the early modern period are digitized and accessible to contemporary audiences. Northeastern is privileged to host one of the oldest projects in the field of digital  Continue Reading »

Two DSG Projects Receive NEH Funding

We’re happy to report that two Digital Scholarship Group projects have received grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to pursue projects in digital humanities research and pedagogy. The TAPAS (TEI Archiving, Publishing, and Access Service) project has received funding to begin development of the TAPAS Classroom, an initiative to support teaching and  Continue Reading »

The WWP Receives Funding for Intertextual Networks Project

Sarah Connell, Project Manager on the Women Writers Project, has an exciting announcement! Since 1986, The Women Writers Project has been committed to ensuring that texts written by women in the early modern period are digitized and accessible to contemporary audiences. Northeastern is privileged to host one of the oldest projects in the field of digital humanities  Continue Reading »

DH Open Office Hours featuring Special Guest Sarah Connell

Sarah Connell of the Women Writers Project will be presenting her talk, entitled “What Stuff Are You Reading Here?”: Encoding Intertextuality in Early Women’s Texts. Digital Humanities Open Office Hours are held each week in the Digital Scholarship Commons (on the second floor of Snell Library). DH Open Office Hours are opportunities for students, faculty members,  Continue Reading »

The WWP Adds Several New Exhibits to Women Writers in Context

Sarah Connell, Project Manager on the Women Writers Project, passed along another exciting announcement! Since 1986, The Women Writers Project has been committed to ensuring that texts written by women in the early modern period are digitized and accessible to contemporary audiences. Northeastern is privileged to host one of the oldest projects in the field of digital  Continue Reading »

17 New Texts (!) in Women Writers Online

Sarah Connell, Project Manager on the Women Writers Project, passed along this exciting announcement. Since 1986, The Women Writers Project has been committed to ensuring that texts written by women in the early modern period are digitized and accessible to contemporary audiences. Northeastern is privileged to host one of the oldest projects in the field of digital  Continue Reading »

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

The Women Writers Project is happy to announce that Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. We invite you to explore the collection at: http://wwo.wwp.northeastern.edu/WWO Women Writers Online now contains more than 350 texts published between 1526 and 1850, including new works by Aphra  Continue Reading »

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